Nursing Week 2018

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For this year’s nursing week (May 7-11), we asked nurses from across Sinai Health System to reflect on their own experience, from those just starting their careers to those who are in formal leadership roles, to answer the question “How can every nurse be a leader?” Stay tuned to this page as we highlight their responses over the course of the week.

Setting an example for others

May 11, 2018
"Every nurse can be a leader by setting an example for others. They can do so by having self-awareness, reflecting on their practice and identifying areas for learning and growth. By doing so, they are contributing to a culture of commitment, excellence, team work and collaboration."
Mary Zheng, Advanced Practice Nurse for Mental Health, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare

Empower others to perform at their very best

May 11, 2018
"I believe that every nurse can not only be a leader but a transformational leader. Every time we take the opportunity to learn, by asking a question or offering a solution we inspire and empower others to commit and perform at their very best."
Nelly Amaral, Director, Nursing Quality and Performance, Sinai Health System

Working together to address concerns

May 10, 2018
"Personally, I think every nurse can use their own discretion and judgment to be a leader in a specific time. If they have concerns about a patient’s care, they need to initiate the conversation with other nurses and interprofessional health team members and use available resources to address the concern."
Neda Mehr, Registered Practical Nurse, Transitional Care, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare

Establishing trust and respect

May 10, 2018
"Taking your clinical skills and applying them to a role or environment where you can make the greatest impact, is how I view leadership in nursing. At Circle of Care, nurses act as an important liaison in the home between the clients and caregivers, and the Personal Support Workers who provide care. We work hard to establish a level of trust and respect. By giving clients and family members a voice, this paves the way to a client-centred experience and leads to better outcomes and greater independence at home."
Johanne Loughrey, Registered Practical Nurse, Clinical Practice Lead, Circle of Care

Importance of being visible

May 9, 2018
"When you are at the bedside, you learn how important it is to build a rapport and be visible to your patients. It’s how you can advocate for their needs and demonstrate your care and understanding. Now that my role is one that is more operational, I still use those same principles to help me lead and work across Sinai Health."
Kate Wilkinson, Vice President of Quality and Clinical Programs, Sinai Health System

First to see an opportunity

May 9, 2018
"I think that every nurse can be a leader because we often are the first to see an opportunity to improve something for our patients. With my falls prevention research I had the courage to speak up, ask for help and had the support to lead the change."
Iliana Kraleva-Rachkova, Registered Nurse, Surgical Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital

Leadership can be attributed to an attitude

May 8, 2018
"Leadership does not have to mean being in management, being part of committees, or having the title of ‘leader.’ Leadership can be attributed to an attitude. I found early on that being a nurse thrusts you into situations that require you to take charge, whether you are ready or not. I am very fortunate to have experienced great mentors throughout my career; if it were not for these people and their coaching I would not be where I am today."
Michael Abd El Malak, Registered Nurse, Emergency Department, Mount Sinai Hospital

Leadership means safe, effective nursing care

May 8, 2018
"I believe as nurses we can all be a leader when we are advocating for our patients. In order to provide quality, safe and effective nursing care, we need to feel comfortable discussing the needs of our patients with the whole care team."
Amy Azusana, Registered Practical Nurse, Transitional Care, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare

Being true to oneself

May 7, 2018
"Every nurse can be a leader once they have an understanding of the vision and mission of the organization. He or she must be true to oneself and have the collective qualities of being honest, understanding, urbane in one's demeanour, knowledgeable and have a penchant for learning."
Valerie Johnson, Registered Nurse, Orthopedics, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare

The most amazing advocates

May 7, 2018
"When we listen to each other we can accomplish many things. When we listen to our patients we are the most amazing advocates in the world."
Lindsay Pollard, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Women’s and Infants Program, Mount Sinai Hospital

Quick Links

  • Mary Zheng,
    Advanced Practice Nurse for Mental Health, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare
  • Nelly Amaral,
    Director, Nursing Quality and Performance, Sinai Health System
  • Neda Mehr,
    Registered Practical Nurse, Transitional Care, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare
  • Johanne Loughrey,
    Registered Practical Nurse, Clinical Practice Lead, Circle of Care
  • Kate Wilkinson,
    Vice President of Quality and Clinical Programs, Sinai Health System
  • Iliana Kraleva-Rachkova,
    Registered Nurse, Surgical Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital
  • Michael Abd El Malak,
    Registered Nurse, Emergency Department, Mount Sinai Hospital
  • Amy Azusana,
    Registered Practical Nurse, Transitional Care, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare
  • Valerie Johnson,
    Registered Nurse, Orthopedics, Bridgepoint Active
  • Lindsay Pollard,
    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Women’s and Infants Program, Mount Sinai Hospital

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